Victoria Granof’s Pasta con Ceci Recipe on Food52 (2024)

5 Ingredients or Fewer

by: Genius Recipes

April3,2021

4.7

66 Ratings

  • Cook time 25 minutes
  • Serves 2

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Author Notes

It’s astonishing how much comfort you can derive—fast—out of basic ingredients you’ve used a thousand times. Here are the keys: First, you need to use all of the olive oil—it gives the soup substance and body, carries the other flavors, and makes up for the fact that you’re making an otherwise austere soup without a rich stock. As Granof says, “It’s what’ll make you think you’re on a balcony in Naples when you eat this.” Second, cook the garlic in the oil until it’s actually browned a bit, not simply softened. This makes the flavor toasty and nutty, and not bitter, despite what nonna might say. You can leave this as soupy or stewy as you like. Granof makes it for her son once a week. "I used to give him Parmesan rinds to teethe on, and when he no longer needed to teethe, I started throwing them in this pasta." Adapted slightly from Chickpeas by Victoria Granof (Short Stack Editions, 2015). —Genius Recipes

  • Test Kitchen-Approved

What You'll Need

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Victoria Granof’s Pasta conCeci

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoonsextra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 3 tablespoonsgood tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoonkosher salt, or more to taste
  • 1 1/2 cupscooked chickpeas (or one 15-ounce can, drained and rinsed)
  • 1/2 cupuncooked ditalini pasta (or another small shape, like macaroni)
  • 2 cupsboiling water
  • Crushed red pepper flakes, for serving
Directions
  1. In a large heavy-bottomed pot, heat the olive oil until it shimmers. Add the garlic and cook, stirring until it becomes lightly browned and fragrant. Stir in the tomato paste and salt and fry for 30 seconds or so. Add the chickpeas, pasta, and boiling water. Stir to scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pot, lower the heat, and simmer until the pasta is cooked and most of the liquid has been absorbed, about 15 to 20 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning. To serve, ladle the pasta into shallow bowls, sprinkle with crushed red pepper flakes, and drizzle a bit of extra-virgin olive oil on top.

Tags:

  • Stew
  • Soup
  • Pasta
  • Italian
  • Chickpea
  • Bean
  • 5 Ingredients or Fewer
  • One-Pot Wonders
  • Fry
  • Fall
  • Summer
  • Winter

Recipe by: Genius Recipes

Popular on Food52

119 Reviews

Carina January 17, 2024

A nice, comforting and versatile dish. It's so simple to make with pantry staples. I'd suggest adding an anchovy or a splash of fish sauce for a touch of umami.

I've made this countless times for my family. It was a lifesaver during the height of the pandemic. You can also add some spinach at the end and cover the pot for it to wilt.

Angelika August 25, 2023

This was quick and delish, and the family enjoyed! Bcs I had it on hand, I added some diced zucchini and topped with some crisped prosciutto and Parmesan. Will definitely make again!

fionad June 8, 2022

I'm not going to lie- chickpea pasta sounded very unappealing to me. But I was out of everything except these ingredients and was desperate. And omg this was so freaking good!! We had zero leftovers. Great meal!

willauer May 21, 2022

Oily and unpleasant

Annaperenna May 9, 2021

This is one of my favorite recipes. It's fast. It's easy. And it is delicious. I make it whenever I want a quick and easy pantry dinner.

Delish! Added frozen butternut squash chunks and I thought it was divine.

aclincol February 24, 2021

I just made this w previously roasted spaghetti squash and white beans. I used less water - maybe 2/3 cup. It was great! All I had was Trader Joe’s paste and CA olive oil and it was very good just with staples.

Michel January 1, 2021

This was delicious. High ratio of tastiness to effort! I might increase the water to 2.5 cups.

JV December 18, 2020

I’ve made this many times, it’s delicious every time. I’ve made it low fodmap with garlic oil and gluten free ditalini. I’ve made it with garlic as well. I always add a small parmesan rind. I also always fry the chickpeas with the oil and tomato paste for a bit to help caramelize and deepen the flavor. Always use my best quality olive oil and double concentrate tomato paste, and the salt is essential. I’ve also cut down the oil to 1 tbs with no issues a few times.

JV December 18, 2020

Another note. I fry the pinch of chili flakes in the first step with the garlic to let it infuse and deepen in flavor. Then, based on how I’m feeling I’ll add a bit of milder aleppo chili once it’s cooked.

Cheryl September 21, 2020

This is a great idea and sounds so easy but really didnt look or taste good. I added lots of cheese to give it flavor and thicken the 'soupiness'. Edible but nothing special.

Bret S. July 16, 2020

I love this as my base recipe. I use 2 cups of chicken stock though and also fresh rosemary with the garlic in the oil. The rosemary really goes well with this. Also adapted it for the instant pot and cook it on high pressure for 4 minutes. Comes out perfect!

Noe50 July 8, 2020

I made this and it was very bland. Not sure what I did wrong. Looked like a straightforward recipe.

CarmelJennifer June 27, 2020

Love this so much and make it every few weeks. We definitely use a lot more garlic and let it brown well before adding the tomato paste. It’s good with escarole or kale wilted in towards the end, but often enough we leave it out.

Jan M. May 13, 2020

Scrumptious recipe! This was my first attempt & it had loads of flavor. Assume my high quality olive oil, Mutti double concentrated tomato paste and Rummo Tubetti Rigati was the ticket. I also added chopped spinach and a cube of parmigiano rind per a couple helpful reviews. My adjustments were 4 TB tomato paste (vs 3 TB), 3/4 cup pasta (vs 1/2 cup ~ wanted a more even distribution between beans and pasta) and 2 1/2 cups water because several people mentioned it was dry. This was far from dry. Don't skimp on salt, pepper nor hot red pepper flakes. My only trepidation was finding a 'toasting' balance to prevent the garlic from burning. I was very careful not to turn the heat up too high and coddle the garlic, stirring constantly at a low heat. What took me so long to make this flavorful and healthy meal?

Jan M. May 13, 2020

Scrumptious recipe! This was my first attempt & it had loads of flavor. Assume my high quality olive oil, Mutti double concentrated tomato paste and Rummo Tubetti Rigati No72' was the ticket. I also added chopped spinach and a cube of parmigiano rind per a couple helpful reviews. My adjustments were 4 TB tomato paste (vs 3 TB), 3/4 cup pasta (vs 1/2 cup ~ wanted a more even distribution between beans and pasta) and 2 1/2 cups water because several people mentioned it was dry. This was far from dry. Don't skimp on salt, pepper nor hot red pepper flakes. My only trepidation was finding a 'toasting' balance to prevent the garlic from burning. I was very careful not to turn the heat up too high and coddle the garlic, stirring constantly at a low heat. What took me so long to make this flavorful and healthy meal?

PCD May 5, 2020

Delicious comfort food! This is so simple to make that it seems approachable even when I come home late from work and feel too tired to cook. I add arugula on top to feel healthy. Thanks for a delicious vegan recipe!

pamire May 4, 2020

This is on permanent rotation at our house. I make it with chickpeas cooked in the Instant Pot (for just 3 minutes after an overnight soaking!) and always use the cooking liquid instead of water (à la Deb Perlman). I also make her garlic, hot pepper flake and olive oil drizzle for the top of it. Toss in a Parmesan rind too if you have one.

Kim April 16, 2020

Quick, simple and absolutely delicious! Appreciate the short list of pantry ingredients. I read other reviews and added some chicken broth rather than water. I had a bag of baby spinach that needed to get used up, so I tossed in a few handfuls for the last 5 minutes of simmering time.

sotis April 8, 2020

This is delicious! I followed the recipe and it turned out great.. def want a good quality olive oil, I think it makes all the difference

If I were to make this again I would use more liquid, it was so good and I wanted it to be more like a hearty soup than noodles+ceci in a broth. So good. Great for quarantine with limited ingredients.

April 4, 2020

This was incredibly good. One of the best dinners I've ever had. I added generous amounts of nutritional yeast and Jack Daniels, plus an entire package of chopped spinach (frozen, because that's what we had). It was perfect. I'm going to make it again tomorrow.

Victoria Granof’s Pasta con Ceci Recipe on Food52 (2024)

FAQs

What is the origin of pasta e Ceci? ›

Hearty and filling, pasta e ceci is a traditional winter dish. It originates from the tradition of “cucina povera” cooking, literally meaning “poor cooking.” Cucina povera dishes were created by Italian peasants who could only afford simple ingredients to cook with.

Who made pasta first Chinese or Italian? ›

Noodles existed in China and Asia long before pasta appeared in the Mediterranean world, and the legend goes that Marco Polo brought pasta to Italy from China in the 13th century.

What was pasta called in Italy? ›

The word 'pasta' is an Italian word meaning 'paste', referring to the paste that pasta dough is made from with egg or water and flour. However, before Italian pasta as we know of, was all over the world, pasta was called 'maccaronaro'.

What is the true origin of pasta? ›

Despite its many forms and the countless texts in which it has appeared, pasta seems to be universally associated with Italy. According to history, however, pasta's earliest roots begin in China, during the Shang Dynasty (1700-1100 BC), where some form of pasta was made with either wheat or rice flour.

Where did pasta fa*gioli originate? ›

The origins of pasta e fa*gioli are not clear, as it is a dish that has been prepared in various regions of Italy for centuries. It is considered to be a peasant dish, as the ingredients are simple and inexpensive, and it is often served as a filling meal during the colder months of the year.

Did pasta originate in Rome? ›

Pasta was invented independently by the Han Chinese and the Etruscans. The idea that Marco Polo brought pasta to Italy from China is a popular bit of folklore.

What pasta originated in Rome? ›

There are four classic Roman pasta dishes: cacio e pepe, carbonara, amatriciana, and alla gricia. Each one is a variation on the other — alla gricia is cacio e pepe plus guanciale, carbonara is gricia plus egg, and so on. These four dishes are famous in all of Italian cooking, not just in Rome.

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